The Crown

The Crown in the early 20th century. The  Crown cottages that were later demolished were on the right.

The Crown has as it’s core a building that probably goes back to the 14th century. Just when it started as a hostelry is difficult to pinpoint. We do know it was a copyhold tenancy of the Manor of Thorney Hall, and that by 1752 William Aldrich was the tenant of the property “lately in the occupation of Stephen Bacon”. Aldrich a Stowmarket Brewer had at this time been acquiring pubs in the area as outlets for his product. Whether the building was used as a pub when he bought it or if he was the first to sell beer here has not yet been discovered. A newspaper advert of 1770 informs of the auction of a blacksmiths shop to be held at the pub. Another Aldrich, this time John was the owner in 1772, and it was he who sold to the brewer John Cobbold in 1805. Cobbold also happened to be Aldrich’s father-in-law to  whom he had become indebted forcing him to dispose of all his pubs to Cobbold in lieu of debts.

Benjamin Batley, landlord here died suddenly in 1825 and an inquest on his death is reported in the local press as follows “on Wednesday last an inquest was held, the deceased called on Monday evening last at the house of William Baker carrier of Stowupland for two parcels, and after having put them in his cart he went into the house to pay for the carriage for them, apparently in good health. In the space of 2 minutes after sitting in the chair he was suddenly seized with a fit of apoplexy, and instantly died”.

In 1842 another occupier of the Crown, Robert Burch was fined 50 shillings and costs of 15/6d, the offence is not known.

During the 1950’s John and Lily Flack were publicans

On June 16th 1966 Alan Smethurst the “Singing Postman” visited the Crown and a video was made of his song “They’re Orl Playin Dommys In The Bar”.

 

 

In 2014 The Crown was bought by local businessman Robert Shelley and his wife Emily, the building was totally renovated and extended to include a restaurant. {NL}

The Crown

The Crown has as it’s core a building that probably goes back to the 14th century. Just when it started as a hostelry is difficult to pinpoint. We do know it was a copyhold tenancy of the Manor of Thorney Hall, and that by 1752 William Aldrich was the tenant of a moiety (part) of a messuage an orchard and a tenement lately in the occupation of Stephen Bacon. Aldrich was a Stowmarket brewer who at this time was purchasing pubs in the area as outlets for his product. Whether the building was already trading when he bought it or if he was the first to use it as a pub is not clear. By 1763 Pelham Aldrich was the tenant and this was so until at least 1766. An advert of 1770 informs of the sale a blacksmiths shop to be held at the pub on Thorney Green. Another Aldrich, this time John was perhaps the owner in 1772, and it was he who sold to John Cobbold in 1805. A deed of December 11th 1811 states “John Aldrich merchant of Ipswich in the sum of £280 paid by John Cobbold of Eye common brewer. All that undivided moiety or half part messuage or tenement, one orchard in Stowupland heretofore the estate of Edward Beverley and Dorothy his wife and also all that tenement adjoining in Stowupland heretofore the estate of Edward Bacon which said John Aldrich had under the will of his father July 2nd 1789”. By 1834 brewer John Cobbold solely owned the premises.

When Benjamin Batley was landlord here until his death in 1825, “on Wednesday last an inquest was held, the deceased called on Monday evening last at the house of William Baker carrier of Stowupland for two parcels, and after having put them in his cart he went into the house to pay for the carriage for them, apparently in good health. In the space of 2 minutes after sitting in the chair he was suddenly seized with a fit of apoplexy, and instantly died”. 1842 Robert Burch fined 50 shillings and costs of 15/6d upon information given by William Kidney, appeal dismissed, the offence is not known. In conversation with a reporter in 1949 landlord Robert Flack said “I think this used to be a private house” speaking in his bar parlour with a low ceiling hung about with saddlery “they used to have shilling licences for selling home made beer, I think that’s how it started up”. Mr Flack then produced two glasses and chinked them together; they made a fine ringing sound. “Old punch glasses” he said, “for egg flip. They haven’t been used for years. I’ve got a few old beer mugs left too. The Yanks and the South Africans bought the lot. One chap gave me 35 shillings once for a quart mug, then sat down with it in that chair, and promptly broke it, then I’m d….d if I didn’t have to sell him a pint one as well”.

On June 16th 1966 Alan Smethurst the “Singing Postman” a well known Norfolk celebrity visited the Crown and a video was made of his song “They’re Orl Playin Dommys In The Bar”. In November 1966 the building was re-thatched.

Another survivor, this establishment now serves meals and thrives in uncertain times, long may it continue.

1752               Stephen Bacon occupier, a pub?

1758               Robert Herne Stowupland innholder, indemnity bond

17–                Turner before 1763

1763-1766     Christian Tricker, rent 7 pence

1768-1772     John Tricker, a John buried 1783

1806               T J B Balls cricket match

1811               William Battley occupier

1820-1825     Benjamin Batley, buried Nov 1825 age 54

1827-1874     Robert Burch, buried 1874 age 80

1874-1894     Charles Barnard, nephew of Robert Burch. Accidental death of Barnard Dec 12th 1894, from suffocation, through falling on his face on a pillow when in a faint, age 49.

1894-1904     Mrs Mary Ann Barnard widow age 52 in 1891

1904-1929     Arthur Edward Forsdyke

1929-1964     John Robert Flack, he married Lily Makings, daughter of Thomas of the Barge

1964-1971     Hugh R Jarvis & Brenda, she was daughter of John R Flack

1971-1973     Raymond Wood

1974               Graham L & John M Wood

1975-1976     Raymond Wood

1977-1989     John C Hunting

1990               Peter R Craven

1991-1994     Steven Cooper

1995-2000     John S Collis